Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Donnerstag, 24. Juli 2014

CFK, again: I will not sign off on default

Thursday, July 24, 2014

CFK, again: I will not sign off on default

President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner waves at Yamaha factory workers and supporters in Mendoza yesterday.
Yesterday’s meeting between gov’t and court mediator Pollack postponed until today
“I want to tell all Argentines that I will not sign anything that jeopardizes future generations,” President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner said yesterday in a speech that served to reaffirm a perceived recovery in her image among the electorate, particularly as result of her administration’s handling of the struggle against holdout hedge funds. (See next page.)
“They’ll have to come up with a new term for when a debtor has paid, the payment is blocked, and an external party prevents restructured bondholders from receiving their money,” Fernández de Kirchner declared at the inauguration of a Yamaha plant in Mendoza, defiant as ever.
There were apparently no doubts in the president’s mind that the country will not willingly declare a default on July 31 if settlement is not sealed with funds led by Elliott Management and Aurelius Management. For the government, the deposit was made, and its responsibilities thus fulfilled. She insisted that the “vultures” provide insurance against possible claims by other investors over the violation of the Rights Upon Future Offers (RUFO) clause if they consider its application to be impossible.
There was also a palpable shift away from the notion the government is bent on a return to international credit markets at any cost.
“When was the last time we had access to foreign credit lines?” she asked, answering: “not in the last decade, but in the 90s” and adding that “when Néstor (Kirchner) came to power, foreign currency debt in the hands of private investors amounted to 166 percent of GDP, and now it is only eight percent of GDP. We must avoid going back to that hell that hampered our ability to develop.”
“I’ve heard the story about dollars flooding into the country before: stones, toads and snakes rained down on us after the mega-debt swap of 2001,” she stated.
Negotiating
Fernández de Kirchner slammed NML Capital and other hedge funds for accusing the country of refusing to negotiate, saying Argentina has shown willingness to fulfill commitments with 100 percent of creditors.
“We have travelled around the world since 2005 to negotiate with banks and investors for them to engage in debt swaps, after which 92.4 percent of bondholders did so. How can they say we have not negotiated?”
She also highlighted having “negotiated with Repsol for two years, and if that’s not enough for them, eight ministers came out and went before we were able to reach an agreement with the Paris Club” group of creditor nations, to which close to US$9 billion was owed.
The president reiterated that the “vulture funds’” real objective is to make the debt swaps collapse and make Argentina pay its debt by handing over the Vaca Muerta shale oil and gas formation in Patagonia.
Meeting adjourned
Daniel Pollack, the mediator in the Argentina debt dispute said he had to push back by a day the start of the latest round of settlement talks yesterday, because the Argentine delegation “could not get here in time.”
Pollack, a New York lawyer appointed to oversee the settlement discussions, had scheduled a meeting for 11am Argentine time after a US judge on Tuesday ordered the parties to meet “continuously” until a deal is reached.
He said in an email the scheduled meeting in New York “had to be postponed, because the Argentines said they could not get here in time.” He later said the meeting had been rescheduled for today at 1pm Argentine time.
Argentina faces a July 30 deadline to cut a deal with bondholders who demand full payment for defaulted bonds, instead of a reduced amount. Absent an agreement, it could default on its debt at the end of the month for the second time in the 21st century.
Argentina, which defaulted on about US$100 billion in 2002, has been pushed to the brink of a fresh debt default by US court decisions that it pay the US$1.33 billion face value of the bonds plus interest to bondholders who did not participate in debt swaps in 2005 and 2010. The bondholders who participated in the debt swap accepted receiving a fraction of the bonds’ full value.
The July 30 deadline faced by Argentina is to pay holdouts led by Elliott Management’s NML Capital Ltd and Aurelius Capital Management.
The country argues that paying the holdouts would open it up to as much as US$15 billion in claims from other investors and further strain its financial condition.
The originally scheduled Wednesday meeting with Pollack, a partner at the law firm McCarter & English, was scheduled at a hearing Tuesday before US District Judge Thomas Griesa, who called the possibility of default “the worst thing I can envision.”
Pollack, who was appointed June 23 as a mediator, has been holding meetings with the parties, publicly acknowledging talking twice with Argentine officials.
After Tuesday’s hearing, NML issued a statement saying it was prepared to meet with Pollack and was “confident this matter could be resolved quickly if Argentina would join us in settlement discussions.”
In a statement released late Tuesday, the Economy Minister said Griesa was “threatening the Argentine Republic with what he insists on calling ‘default.’”
The possibility of a default came after Argentina last month made what the ministry said was $1.15 billion payment for its restructured bondholders. That money included US$539 million deposited indentured trustee Bank of New York Mellon Corp.
But Griesa deemed the payment a violation of injunctions that required Argentina to pay the holdouts the US$1.33 billion the next time it paid the restructured bondholders, and told the bank to return the money.
BNY Mellon has sought to hold onto the money to minimize its liability. Griesa on Tuesday told the bank and holdout creditors to try to reach an agreement that would minimize further litigation.
Herald staff with Reuters

Argentina meets with vulture funds in NY

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Argentina meets with vulture funds in NY

US court appointed mediator in the Argentine debt crisis Daniel Pollack leaves the US Federal Courthouse in New York.
Argentina’s and holdout hedge funds’ representatives met today at a hearing called by the court-appointed special mediator Daniel Pollack, in New York, in their first face-to-face encounter in a race against the clock to reach a settlement before next Wednesday, as ordered by US Judge Thomas Griesa.
The meeting was originally scheduled for yesterday, but according to Mr. Pollack Argentina’s defence could not make it in time to the meeting that had been set for yesterday at 11 a.m.
Both parties arrived in the mediator’s office on the 27th floor at 245 Park Avenue around 1.30 p.m. (Argentinean time).
The Argentine delegation was formed by officials from the Economy Minister: Treasury Procurer Angelina Abbona, Finance Secretary Pablo López and Legal and Administrative Secretary Federico Thea.
This is the first time representatives of the parties involved in the 1.3 billion dollar legal dispute sit at the negotiating table face-to-face, having both only met separately with mediator Pollack.

Nicht vorgesehen ist in den Vorschlägen der Kommission indes dem Vernehmen nach, auch den Kauf russischer Staatsanleihen zu verbieten. // was nicht ist kann noch kommen....


SanktionenEuropa nimmt Russlands Banken ins Visier

Die EU verschärft ihre Sanktionen gegen Russland. Ziel sind dabei wohl auch die Banken. Die Geldhäuser müssen sich darauf einstellen, schwerer neuen Kredit zu bekommen.

© BLOOMBERGVergrößernDie EU will auch russische Banken mit Sanktionen treffen.
Vertreter der 28 EU-Mitgliedstaaten haben an diesem Donnerstag in Brüssel die Sanktionen gegen Russland ausgeweitet. Optionen waren dabei nach Angaben von Diplomaten auch, den Handel mit Rüstungsgütern zu beschränken sowie mit Schlüsseltechnologien im Energiesektor. Eine entsprechende Liste mit Vorschlägen hatte die Europäische Kommission im Auftrag der Mitgliedstaaten erarbeitet.
Ins Visier genommen hat die Kommission offenbar vor allem auch russische Banken, an denen der Staat mehr als 50 Prozent hält. So könnte die EU den Kauf neuer Aktien oder von Anleihen untersagen, die solche Banken ausgegeben haben. Entsprechendes beschlossen haben die Mitgliedstaaten aber noch nicht.
Das würde die Fähigkeit der Banken zur Finanzierung der russischen Wirtschaft einschränken. Das Kaufverbot würde sich auf Papiere mit einer Laufzeit von mehr als 90 Tagen beziehen und sowohl für den Primär- als auch für den Sekundärmarkt gelten. Nicht vorgesehen ist in den Vorschlägen der Kommission indes dem Vernehmen nach, auch den Kauf russischer Staatsanleihen zu verbieten. Abwenden könnte Russland die schärferen Sanktionen nur, wenn es die Bedingungen erfüllt, die von den EU-Außenministern am Dienstag genannt wurden: Dazu gehört der Stopp von Waffenlieferungen an die Separatisten und eine aktive Mitarbeit an der Aufklärung des Flugzeugabsturzes.

Russland hat hohe Reserven

Die Europäer bewegen sich mit der Neuausrichtung der Sanktionspolitik insgesamt wohl auf die Vereinigten Staaten zu, die schon Mitte Juli gegen russische Banken vorgegangen sind. Sie hatten der Gasprombank und der Vnesheconombank sowie den Energieunternehmen Novatek und Rosneft faktisch den Zugang zum Kapitalmarkt abgeschnitten. Offenbar erwarten die Vereinigten Staaten, dass auch die Europäer diese Sanktionen beachten.
Wie stark die russische Wirtschaft am europäischen Kapitalmarkt hängt, ist nicht genau zu beziffern. Nach Berechnungen der Nachrichtenagentur Bloomberg waren Konzerne aus Russland insgesamt allein in den vergangenen beiden Jahren an Unternehmenskäufen und -verkäufen im Volumen von 180 Milliarden Dollar beteiligt. Besonders betroffen wäre von zusätzlichen Sanktionen London, das als Zentrum für russische Geldgeschäfte in Europa und mit Amerika gilt.
Umgekehrt ist aber auch viel westliches Geld in Russland. Nach Berechnungen der Investmentbank Goldman Sachs haben europäische Banken Kredite über 211 Milliarden Dollar an Kreditnehmer in Russland und der Ukraine vergeben. Unter den einzelnen Banken sind die größten Kreditgeber die österreichische Raiffeisen Bank, die französische Société Générale, die italienische Unicredit, die ungarische OTP Bank sowie die skandinavische Nordea Bank. „Angesichts der Risiken dürften die europäischen Banken ihr Wachstum und ihre Präsenz in der Region neu bewerten“, heißt es bei Goldman Sachs. „Wir gehen deswegen davon aus, dass die Reaktion historisch gesehen schnell erfolgen wird.“
Mehr zum Thema
Russland könnte Sanktionen vermutlich einige Zeit aushalten, da das Land über Währungsreserven in Höhe von rund 470 Milliarden Dollar verfügt, die zu rund 10 Prozent aus Gold bestehen. Russland strebt eine größere Unabhängigkeit vom Dollar an, allerdings dürfte noch ein erheblicher Teil seiner Reserven aus der amerikanischen Währung bestehen. Im Frühjahr hatte die russische Notenbank einen deutlichen Rückgang ihrer Bestände an amerikanischen Staatsanleihen ausgewiesen.
Auf der anderen Seite hatten etwa zur gleichen Zeit die in Belgien gehaltenen Bestände an amerikanischen Staatsanleihen deutlich zugenommen. Am Markt kursieren Vermutungen, dass sich es sich um verdeckte Käufe russischer und chinesischer Investoren handeln könnte.
Unabhängig von den Entscheidungen der Kommission in Brüssel will der staatliche norwegische Pensionsfonds seine Anlagepolitik gegenüber Russland überdenken. Der Fonds gehört mit einem verwalteten Vermögen von fast 900 Milliarden Dollar zu den größten Anlegern der Welt. Ende des vergangenen Jahres hielt der Fonds für 3,6 Milliarden Dollar russische Aktien und für 4 Milliarden Dollar russische Anleihen, darunter Papiere der VTB-Bank.

Aurelius says it will not ask Griesa for a stay

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Aurelius says it will not ask Griesa for a stay

Argentine debt holdout investor Mark Brodsky, chairman of Aurelius Capital Management, said his group will not ask US Judge Thomas Griesa to suspend his payment order, after a story in Argentina's La Nación newspaper today suggested that Paul Singer’s NML Capital Ltd could ask Griesa to reinstate the stay of injunction as requested by Argentina.
The head of one of the lead holdout investors, in the case which awarded them $1.33 billion plus accrued interest, said in a statement that the newspaper story was “utter fiction”
La Nación reported that the other lead holdout in the case, NML Capital Ltd, a division of Elliott Management Corp, could call for Griesa in New York to temporarily suspend, or stay, his order that Argentina pay holdout creditors.
Argentina was ordered to pay the holdouts at the same time it paid bondholders who accepted an exchange, or restructuring, of defaulted debt in 2005 and 2010. Argentine government says says the order is pushing it towards default.

Hier wurde (wird noch?) in Darmstadt/Bessungen für Ordnung gesorgt....auf einer Radrunde durch Darmstadt


Argentina to meet with Vulture Funds in NY

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Argentina to meet with Vulture Funds in NY

US court appointed mediator in the Argentine debt crisis Daniel Pollack leaves the US Federal Courthouse in New York.
A hearing originally scheduled for yesterday will take place today at 1 p.m. (Argentinean time) in New York. Court-appointed special mediator Daniel Pollack will head the first face-to-face meeting between legal representatives of Argentina and vulture funds.
This is the first time lawyers of the parties involved in the 1.3 billion dollar legal dispute will sit at the negotiating table face-to-face, having both only met separately with mediator Pollack.
According to Mr. Pollack, Argentina’s defence could not make it in time to the meeting that had been set for yesterday at 11 am.

El fondo NML Capital, del grupo Elliott, el principal demandante en el litigio contra la Argentina, habría decidido ayer a la tarde cambiar de estrategia a fin de poder activar las negociaciones y avanzar con el cobro de su deuda

ECONOMÍAJUEVES 24 DE JULIO 2014

Los holdouts evalúan pedirle a Griesa que reponga el stay para destrabar el conflicto

El fondo NML Capital, del grupo Elliott, el principal demandante en el litigio contra la Argentina, habría decidido ayer a la tarde cambiar de estrategia a fin de poder activar las negociaciones y avanzar con el cobro de su deuda
La de este jueves podría ser una jornada clave en el marco de la batalla judicial que enfrenta el país con un grupo de acreedores de bonos en default que no aceptaron ingresar a los dos canjes de deuda. Y es que, para beneplácito del gobierno de la presidente Cristina Kirchner, el principal fondo demandante podría pedirle al juez Thomas Griesa que reponga el amparo, una medida que reclama la Argentina para cumplir con el fallo que favoreció a los holdouts.
En la víspera de la audiencia que hoy mantendrán las partes con el mediador Daniel Pollack, los abogados del demandante habrían estado dando forma a un escrito en el que le pedirían al juez Thomas Griesa la extensión del stay (suspensión de los efectos de la sentencia) hasta fin de año, de acuerdo a lo consignado por el diario La Nación.
Y es que de reponerse el amparo, los holdouts no podrían embargar los fondos argentinos destinados al pago de la deuda reestructurada (tampoco el país caería en default porque estaría cumpliendo con sus obligaciones) y, a la vez, permitiría que caduque la cláusula RUFO, el talón de Aquiles para la Argentina.
Ocurre que de violarse esa cláusula (es decir, que el país le pague a los fondos buitres antes del 31 de diciembre la suma que estableció Griesa, la cual es superior a lo acordado con los bonistas que aceptaron los dos canjes de deuda) abriría las puertas para que ese 92% de tenedores de títulos reestructurados con una quita del 70 por ciento gatillen una catarata de demandas en reclamo de que el Gobierno mejoró la oferta que les hizo en 2005 y 2010 y la equipare con la de los holdouts.
Pero este cambio de estrategia de NML Capital, del multimillonario Paul Singer, no sería gratis. A cambio de la espera para poder cobrar su deuda recién a partir de 2015, le pediría al juez de Nueva York que la Argentina formalice su compromiso de negociación no sólo verbalmente, sino que también deposite una suma de dinero como garantía de que efectivamente hay voluntad de acordar.
Fuentes oficiales especulaban ayer por la tarde con que el escrito sería presentado hoy mismo en el juzgado de Griesa para que la cuestión quede en manos del magistrado lo antes posible. Las mismas fuentes coincidían en que si el pedido lo presentan los fondos buitres no habría razones para que el magistrado no haga lugar a la solicitud, publica el matutino.
Y añaden que esta novedad llegó ayer a oídos del Gobierno, y la duda ahora se centraría en torno del dinero que la Argentina debería depositar no como garantía de pago sino como reaseguro de que la negociación seguirá hasta enero, cuando ya no rija la cláusula RUFO.
Se cree que los fondos buitres pedirían una importante suma de dinero para que quede inmovilizada hasta 2015. El Gobierno podría contraofertar una suma menor, y en eso estará la primera parte de la negociación.
Hoy llegará a Nueva York la delegación que envió el Gobierno para concurrir a las oficinas de Pollack y negociar por primera vez con el mediador y los representantes de los fondos especulativos en la misma mesa. Las dos anteriores audiencias habían sido sólo con el hombre designado por Griesa para mediar.
Los secretarios de Finanzas, Pablo López; de Legal y Técnica, Federico Thea (ambos del Ministerio de Economía); y la procuradora del Tesoro, Angelina Abbona, viajaron con la idea de pedirles a los acreedores que aporten un seguro por el equivalente a los 120.000 millones de dólares que, dicen en el Ejecutivo, se necesitarían si se disparara la cláusula RUFO.
Argentina ya giró el pago del bono Discount para la deuda reestructurada al Banco de Nueva York (BoNY), pero los fondos quedaron bloqueados por Griesa, quien en su sentencia obliga al gobierno argentino a pagarles de manera simultánea a los fondos especulativos que litigaron en su corte y a los bonistas del canje. 
"No sé cuál será el término, porque las calificadoras y los técnicos siempre encuentran un término para disfrazar lo que pasa. Aquí Argentina pagó y alguien lo bloqueó y no deja que el pago llegue a los bonistas que entraron al canje de buena fe", reiteró ayer la presidente Cristina Kirchner.
En un acto en General Rodríguez, la jefa de Estado mencionó un planteo que había sugerido el Ministerio de Economía el martes, y que tendrá lugar hoy en las consideraciones que hagan los enviados del Gobierno ante Pollack. Se trata de la posibilidad de requerir a los fondos que tomen unseguro financiero y cubran los riesgos y los costos de una eventual aplicación de la claúsulaRUFO. "Si no aplica, como ellos dicen, que nos den un seguro y nosotros quedamos cubiertos", apuntó la mandataria.