Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Dienstag, 25. April 2017

Gonzenbach (gV Carpevigo Holding AG) bösgläubig....da heisst der Schadensersatz schlägt voll zu....


Bloomberg View) -- The launch of China’s second aircraft carrier, expected as soon as this week, will be an important and depressing moment for India. The “Type 001A” -- likely to be named the “Shandong” -- will give China an edge for the first time in the carrier race with its Asian rival, a literal two-to-one advantage

Bloomberg View) -- The launch of China’s second aircraft carrier, expected as soon as this week, will be an important and depressing moment for India. The “Type 001A” -- likely to be named the “Shandong” -- will give China an edge for the first time in the carrier race with its Asian rival, a literal two-to-one advantage. After decommissioning the INS Viraat earlier this year, the Indian Navy is down to a single carrier, INS Vikramaditya. Worse, the Shandong has been built at China’s own giant shipyard at Dalian; Vikramaditya is merely a repurposed 1980s-era Russian carrier formerly known as the Admiral Gorshkov.
Even more telling than the raw numbers is what China’s progress says about India’s ability to provide security in its own backyard. Chinese naval strategists have open designs on the Indian Ocean: According to one, “China needs two carrier strike groups in the West Pacific Ocean and two in the Indian Ocean.” The government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi has talked a great deal about revitalizing the Indian military; it’s opened the defense sector up to greater foreign investment and is building a much-closer relationship with the U.S. military, largely with China in mind. But spending has lagged. Worse, successive governments simply don’t seem to have thought through where best to direct those scarce resources.
For its part, the Indian Navy has gone all-in on a strategy that emphasizes carrier battle groups. The idea is that India must dominate the ocean that bears its name and needs carriers in order to project power well beyond its shores. As a result, it wasted far too much time and treasure on the Admiral Gorshkov, which arrived from Russia six years late and at three times the cost that had initially been promised.
Its efforts to develop a homegrown carrier have been even more misbegotten. The Navy plans to name, commission and float the INS Vikrant next year. At that point, the ship reportedly won’t have its aviation complex in place, or even anti-aircraft missiles. The Navy has puzzlingly refused to buy India’s indigenous light fighter, the Tejas, saying it’s too heavy. Meanwhile, the MiG-29s being used instead are enormously troubled, accordingto India’s government auditor; more than 60 percent of their engines were withdrawn from service or rejected in just four years. The Vikrant will only be properly combat-ready by 2023 -- eight years behind schedule.
No one would expect India to match China’s defense spending head-to-head. China’s economy is four times the size of India’s; not surprisingly, its defense budget is at least three times larger. But the People’s Republic faces a parallel dilemma when confronting the U.S., whose military budget is about three times as big as China’s.
China has approached this disparity with a much clearer strategy in mind, as well as a far more rational evaluation of its relative strength. Rather than focusing on matching America’s carrier fleet, China first emphasized asymmetric weaponry such as ballistic missiles and submarines, a reflection of the Soviets’ successful Cold War strategy. Only now -- as its interests and capabilities have grown -- is it pouring resources into developing carrier groups.
By contrast, India’s carrier-first strategy has drained the Navy of resources and left it with just 13 conventional submarines in service. Eleven of those are more than a quarter-century old. The two new ones, amazingly, were commissioned and sent out to wander the deep sea without their main armament, torpedoes. Nor has India tried to counter China’s numerical superiority -- 70 to 15 -- in terms of submarines with specialized anti-submarine weaponry, including helicopters. The Indian fleet has less than 30 superannuated medium-sized anti-sub helicopters, the first of which was bought in 1971.
India’s problem isn’t ultimately a shortage of money; it’s a lack of forethought and political courage. Carriers are big and showy, and bolster national pride; diesel submarines don’t, or at least not to the same degree. A more rational strategy for India -- and its peers in Asia and the Pacific Rim who fear China’s growing military might -- would ensure that India’s submarine fleet and its anti-submarine armaments are capable enough on their own to deter attempts to control the Indian Ocean, while closer ties with other navies fill in the gaps.
That would require a clear-eyed appraisal of India’s defense and economic capabilities and requirements -- a problem when India doesn’t have an outline of its strategy on the lines of American or Chinese white papers, nor even a full-time defense minister. The Navy is fortunately starting to train more closely with the U.S. and other partners such as Japan, which should increase its effectiveness. But until it thinks harder about where its money should go, it’s going to have a tricky time keeping China out of its backyard.
This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.
Mihir Sharma is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was a columnist for the Indian Express and the Business Standard, and he is the author of “Restart: The Last Chance for the Indian Economy.”
  1. Granted, China's first aircraft carrier was also constructed around the shell of a Russian vessel, the Varyag, which the Chinese pretended to have purchased to use as a floating casino.
For more columns from Bloomberg View, visit http://www.bloomberg.com/view.
Bloomberg

gross


Pflichtlektüre für VEN/PDVSA-Fans


Mit dem Beschluss vom 20.4.2017 des OLG München 21 U 39/17 weiter unten auszugsweise gebloggt "korrigiert" der 21. Senat sein "eigenes" Urteil vom 22.6.2015 21 U 4719/14 (durch google auffindbar) in Bezug auf die Allmachtfantasien von Wagner......

Sparkline 73,206

Montag, 24. April 2017


Die angeführten Urteile (München -Carpevigo- und Karlsruhe -Solarworld- ) tragen beide meine Handschrift.....



Law Corner: Das Aus für querulatorische Kündigungskläger bei Anleihe-Restrukturierungen? – Der neueste Stand


Dr. Christian Becker, Lutz Pospiech, Rechtsanwälte, GÖRG, München
Dr. Christian Becker (li), Lutz Pospiech, REs,
GÖRG, München
Der Law Corner Beitrag von Dr. Christian Becker, Partner, und Lutz Pospiech, Rechtsanwalt, GÖRG Partnerschaft von Rechtsanwälten mbB, München
Häufig erwerben Anleihegläubiger nach der Veröffentlichung von Restrukturierungsmaßnahmen Schuldverschreibungen deutlich unter deren Nennwert. Anschließend kündigen diese Anleihegläubiger die Schuldverschreibungen mit dem Hinweis auf die Restrukturierungssituation des Emittenten und verlangen die Rückzahlung des vollen Nennwerts zzgl. aufgelaufener Zinsen. Nachdem diese Praxis bereits durch ein Urteil des OLG Köln vom 9.7.2015 (Az. 3 U 58/12, siehe hierzuBondGuide #23/2015) erheblich eingeschränkt wurde, geben auch eine Entscheidung des OLG München und jüngst ein Urteil des BGH den Emittenten Transaktionssicherheit bei der Abwehr von Rückzahlungsklagen nach Kündigungen.
Geschäftsmodell der „Kündigungskläger“
Durch die Ankündigung von Restrukturierungsmaßnahmen sinkt der Börsenkurs einer Anleihe oft erheblich unter ihren Nennwert. Diesen Kurssturz nutzen querulatorische Kündigungskläger dazu, Schuldverschreibungen günstig zu erwerben. Kurze Zeit später kündigen sie die erworbenen Schuldverschreibungen. Diese Kündigungen werden regelmäßig insbesondere darauf gestützt, dass die Einladung zur Anleihegläubigerversammlung, die über ein Restrukturierungskonzept beschließen soll, angeblich das Angebot einer allgemeinen Schuldenregelung darstellt. Nach vielen Anleihebedingungen stellt das Angebot einer allgemeinen Schuldenregelung einen Kündigungsgrund für die Schuldverschreibungen dar. Darüber hinaus werden die Kündigungen auch allgemein auf eine wesentliche Verschlechterung der Vermögensverhältnisse des Emittenten gestützt.
Entscheidung des OLG München vom 22.6.2015 (Az. 21 U 4719/14)
Allein in der Ankündigung von Restrukturierungsmaßnahmen sieht das OLG München keinen wichtigen Grund für die Kündigung von Schuldverschreibungen, wenn die Verschlechterung der Vermögensverhältnisse eines Emittenten dazu genutzt wurde, um Anleihen zu einem Kurs weit unter Nennwert zu erwerben. Der Umstand der verschlechterten Vermögensverhältnisse sei damit schon in den Einstandspreis eingeflossen und könne daher nicht als wichtiger Grund für eine außerordentliche Kündigung herangezogen werden. Die kündigenden Anleihegläubiger wurden gerade nicht von einer nicht vorhersehbaren Verschlechterung der Vermögensverhältnisse überrascht, sondern haben die unlängst eingetretene Verschlechterung gerade dazu genutzt, um Anleihen zu einem niedrigen Kurs zu erwerben und anschließend zu kündigen. Zudem haben die Gläubiger börsennotierter Anleihen aufgrund der Handelbarkeit der Schuldverschreibungen jederzeit die Möglichkeit, sich auch vor Fälligkeit der Anleihe von ihrem Investment zu trennen.
Entscheidung des BGH vom 8.12.2015 (Az. XI ZR 488/14)
Nunmehr hat sich auch der BGH erstmals zum Ausschluss der Kündigungsrechte nach Bekanntgabe des Restrukturierungskonzepts geäußert und klargestellt, dass Mehrheitsbeschlüsse der Anleihegläubiger gem. § 4 Abs. 2 S. 1 SchVG auch bereits gekündigte Anleihen binden. Die Entscheidungsgründe stehen noch zur Veröffentlichung aus. Jedoch ist schon jetzt erkennbar, dass auch der BGH dem Geschäftsgebaren querulatorischer Kündigungskläger keinerlei Toleranz entgegenbringt.
Fazit
Die Entscheidung des OLG München sorgt bei Anleiheemittenten für weitere Rechtssicherheit bei der Abwehr von Zahlungsansprüchen aufgrund in Restrukturierungssituationen ausgesprochener Kündigungen ihrer Anleihegläubiger. Im Zusammenhang mit der Entscheidung des BGH scheint es für Anleihegläubiger kaum noch mögliche Konstellationen zu geben, ihre Anleihen aufgrund der Bekanntmachung von Restrukturierungsmaßnahmen eines Emittenten zu kündigen und zum Nennwert fällig zu stellen. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass die Unsitte querulatorischer Kündigungskläger, sich in Kenntnis von Restrukturierungssituationen durch die Kündigung von unter Nennwert erworbenen Schuldverschreibungen einen Sondervorteil zu verschaffen, erheblich abnehmen wird.

Mit dem Beschluss vom 20.4.2017 des OLG München 21 U 39/17 weiter unten auszugsweise gebloggt "korrigiert" der 21. Senat sein "eigenes" Urteil vom 22.6.2015 21 U 4719/14 (durch google auffindbar) in Bezug auf die Allmachtfantasien von Wagner......



thats me.....




Riesen Watschen für den gem. Vertreter Wagner (enormes Schadensersatzrisiko) und natürlich für Chaos-Neureuther und seine rechtlichen Berater die die Gläubigerbeschlüsse vorformuliert haben. Wenn Neureuther seinen Gesellschaften und Gesellschftern und Aktionären nicht untreu sein will wird er gut beraten sein die Honorare von Ponzer und Hitzelberger zurückzufordern......!!!!






amit haben immerhin 2 Senate die Auffassung vertreten, dass die Beschlüsse aus 2013 jedenfalls nicht den von der Carpevigo behaupteten Inhalt haben

Hallo Herr Koch,

damit haben immerhin 2 Senate die Auffassung vertreten, dass die Beschlüsse aus 2013 jedenfalls nicht den von der Carpevigo behaupteten Inhalt haben. Dem gV wurden Einzelbefugnisse nicht übertragen. Das wird uns sicher helfen.

Viele Grüße

Handbibliothek